Tag Archive: keywords



Skills on LinkedIn, How to find them in the Alumni Function!

It used to be called Skills and Expertise section on your LinkedIn. Now it is called Skills and Endorsements. Whatever you call it you used to be able to sort through the different skills and select the ones that pertained to you and your industry.

https://brucebix49.wordpress.com/2014/03/19/linkedin-now-allows-you-to-re-arrange-your-skills-and-expertise/

Now that LinkedIn has removed the skills and expertise section from the website, how do you add skills that pertain to you and the position you are looking for. One way that is available on LinkedIn is the alumni section. Alumni section?!

Here is what you do. Start at the toolbar at the top of your page. Scroll over the network section and there is a drop down. Select the “Find Alumni” choice. Click on it. You will now have the choices of not only the college(s) you went to but all colleges listed on LinkedIn profiles. You can use the search box for all colleges.

Select any college or university in the search box. The larger the university the better. Bigger demographics to filter. First select city for search, then select company, and finally profession. (IT, HR, or Marketing). You will then have to “arrow” to the right and there will be a list of skills in desending order of popularity for that position for that company.

Try this with several colleges and universities to see what the skills for this company are prevalent for your position. Add these skills to your LinkedIn profile to help you stand out for these keywords. So if you live in Chicago, want to work at Allstate, and are in Business administration and management these are the skills you should have on your profile.

I’m always happy to connect on LinkedIn with people who read my blog. My email address is BruceBix49@gmail.com. If you find this information valuable please pass this on to others who need help.

I write practically perfect LinkedIn profiles and exemplary executive resumes. Contact me at 224-221-9700 or Email me at bruce@hobknobery.com


Three Keys for Your LinkedIn Headline to STANDOUT!

Most of the LinkedIn profile Headlines I see on LinkedIn today are LinkedIn default headlines. What is the LinkedIn default headline? The default setting is your last job title and the company you worked for.

Example: Marketing Manager at ABC Company. Sounds terribly exciting doesn’t it. I just did a search on LinkedIn for “Marketing Manager” and the results were 1,329,169 results for “Marketing Manager”. Yes, I used the quotes because I wanted that exact phrase. Just a little competition.

So being a Marketing Manager, that’s OK, but it’s JUST OK. You need to breathe some life into your headline in order to stand out on LinkedIn. You are competing with almost 300 million profiles. Your headline does not have to be your job. You are not your job. Even if you are in job search your headline should showcase who you are. It should be your ideal target position and what you do, not just a job title.

The three keys are 1) what you do (KEYWORD), 2) who you help (KEYWORD), and 3) how you help them solve their problem (KEYWORD). Before you start to redesign your headline put yourself in the hiring manager’s place. As the hiring manager ask yourself “Why should I care about your profile, WHAT can you do for me? Your headline should demonstrate that you can add value to the hiring managers company.

The first key for a successful headline is to have your position as keyword in the headline. When people search for what you do, your ideal job title is the Keyword they use to find you, Marketing Manager, It Manager, or Sales Manager.

The second key is who do you help? Set up your headline to laser focus on your ideal person or company. Target or focus your keywords on the companies you would like to work for. Strategically pick those keywords you that you believe the hiring manager is searching for.

The third key is how do you help people. What pain point are you able to solve that no one else can? What problem does that company have. Are you able to cut costs or increase revenue. Are you able to motivate salespeople?

Here is an example of a Headline that captures all three keys:

Experienced Bilingual B2B Sales Professional | Helping French and American Companies expand their International Presence

Plenty of keywords that LinkedIn’s search algorithms can easily find, focusing on your target, and solving a problem. And, it all fits within the 120 spaces LinkedIn allows for the headline.

I’m always happy to connect on LinkedIn with people who read my blog. My email address is BruceBix49@gmail.com. If you find this information valuable please pass this on to others who need help.

I write practically perfect LinkedIn profiles and exemplary executive resumes. Contact me at 224-221-9700 or Email me at BruceBix49@gmail.com.


Where do You Strategically Place Keywords on Your LinkedIn Profile?

The questions is always the same. I want my LinkedIn profile to show up in search, where do I place my keywords? Everyone invariably wants to be on page one on LinkedIn for their keyword(s). So how do they do it?

LinkedIn’s search algorythm is based upon keyword density. So the more often you place your keywords on your LinkedIn profile the higher you will rank. But, that is only part of the equation.

The most important part of keywords is WHERE to place them. LinkedIn’s most heavily weighted section for keywords is the Headline section of your profile. So, if you can place the keyword in the headline more than once it will help your ranking for that keyword. You can, and should, put more than one keyword you are searched for in the headline. If you can fit 4 or 5 words by all means place them in the headline.

The second place that is searched by LinkedIn for keywords is your current position title. If your title has an abbreviation use it but also spell out the title. ex: Chief Financial Officer (CFO).
Make sure you include the keyword(s) in the first line of description of the position.

The third place that is most strategic for keyword placement is/are the past experience section. If you have been a CFO for two or three companies during your work history make sure to include the same keyword(s) in your past experiences. AGAIN, Chief Financial Officer (CFO), it must read identically in all sections.

The fourth strategic area to include your keyword(s) is in the summary section of your profile. Tell your story in the summary section, make sure to include the keyword(s) in the first line also. The summary section gives you the opportunity to strategically place the keyword(s) throughout the section. You have 2000 characters to define yourself, how you have helped companies, and how you solve problems.

At the end of the summary section you can include specialties. Specialties (meaning) keywords, follow each specialty or specialty phrase with a comma, to differentiate each as a KEYWORD.

At the end of the summary section place a “call to action”, CONTACT ME TO SEE HOW I CAN HELP YOUR COMPANY, so those finding you know what to do once they find your profile.

The fifth area to strategically place your keywords is the “Specialties and Expertise” section of your profile. Specialties and expertise is just another word for KEYWORDS. Choose your skills wisely to match your keywords.

One way to confirm the keywords search is to place a keyword search for the word “RETAIL” then click on the profiles that show up. What you will find is the word will show up highlighted in yellow by LinkedIn. This will show you exactly where they search for your keyword.

AND, one bonus area to place keywords is in the “Interests” section of your profile. Not only does LinkedIn search there for keywords, it also treats each keyword as a link to profiles ranked for that keyword on LinkedIn. Click on the link and it will take to a listing of those people using that keyword in their profile. So if you rank high for that keyword you will show up in the search.

One last caveat, when people do a keyword search, LinkedIn will show your first degree connects first then second degree, third degree, and so on. So if you are NOT connected to the person doing the search your profile will not show up in the results.

I’m always happy to connect on LinkedIn with people who read my blog. My email address is BruceBix49@gmail.com. If you find this info valuable please pass this on to others who need help.

I write practically perfect LinkedIn profiles and exemplary executive resumes. Contact me at 224-221-9700 or Email me at BruceBix49@gmail.com.


How to find Keywords for LinkedIn Skills and Expertise.

Now that LinkedIn has removed the definitions and related skills from the LinkedIn profile what are you supposed to do. One of my connections showed me how to find related keywords using Google.

The first step is to use Google, Google Drive (Formerly Google Docs), and Google Chrome.

Step 1) Using Google go to the Google apps and select Google Drive.

Step 2) On left hand side of the page there is a red box that says create, select “Create”

Step 3) From the drop down select the green excel “spreadsheet”

Step 5) In the top two cells of the spreadsheet type in two keywords
I typed in Marketing and Twitter

Step 6) Highlight both cells and a SQUARE box in the lower right cell will appear.

Step 7) Click on the square box, hold down your mouse and at the same time select the “CONTROL” key

Step 8) Drag the box down 8 or 10 different cells and let go

Voila, you now have a list of additional keywords courtesy of Google!!

Now go ahead and select and add skills & expertise to your LinkedIn profile.

I’m always happy to connect on LinkedIn with people who read my blog. My email address is BruceBix49@gmail.com. If you find this info valuable please pass this on to others who need help.

I write practically perfect LinkedIn profiles and exemplary executive resumes. Contact me at 224-221-9700 or Email me at BruceBix49@gmail.com.


Do You Have the New LinkedIn’s “Who’s Viewed Your Profile”?

So where is this section? The new version is part way down

on the right side of your Profile page. Who’s Viewed Your Profile

is a link when you hover your mouse over the words Who’s Viewed Your Profile.

The are two number and phrases there. The top number is the number of people who have actually viewed you profile.

They actually clicked on your profile and looked at your profile information. It may say that your profile has been

viewed 12 times over the last three days or your profile has been viewed 6 times in the past day. You want your

profile views to be at least 4-5 times a day. The average LinkedIn profile is viewed only once a day. If you are in

job search you want that number to be much higher.

The other number and phrase under Who’s viewed you profile” is the total number of times your profile has shown up

in keyword searches. It will say You have shown up in search results 19 times in the past 3 days, or you have shown

up in search results 25 times today.

When you hover your mouse and click on the link will take you to the “Who’s Viewed Your Profile” homepage.

on the homepage you will be able to view the people that looked at your profile. There will be three different

listings depending upon the privacy settings of the viewer.

A) The first setting You Name and headline (Which LinkedIn recommends)

b) Anonymous profile characteristics such as industry and title Note: Selecting this option will disable Profile Stats.

c) You will be totally anonymous Note: Selecting this option will disable Profile Stats.

On the home page will be a listing of the profiles that looked at your profile. To the right of the listing

is a graph for the last 90 days of viewers and search results with a total number of views and a total number

How many times you appeared in LinkedIn Search.

The ideal numbers should be 5 – 10 views per day and at least 50 – 75 search results per day. It will all depend on

the keywords as well as the skills and expertise that you have listed on your profile. The views will depend upon

how well you have crafted your LinkedIn headline to attract attention.